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Injury aftercare

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Blister Edit

Change the dressing at least daily or whenever it becomes wet or dirty. Care should be taken to keep the feet as clean as possible at all times. Use soap and water for cleansing. If you're allergic to the adhesive used in most bandages, switch to adhesive-free dressings or sterile gauze and paper tape. These supplies are generally available at pharmacies.

Seek medical attention if any signs of infection develop:

  • Increased redness, pain, swelling or warmth.
  • Red streaking of the surrounding skin.
  • Pus draining from area (It's not pus if it has been less than a day.)
  • Tender lumps or swelling in your armpit, groin, or neck.
  • Foul odor from the area.
  • Generalized chills or fever over 99.6 degrees F.
  • Not healing well within 1 to 2 weeks.

A tetanus booster shot is recommended for anyone who has not had one in the last 8-10 years. See your healthcare worker.

Follow-up with regular healthcare worker.

Preventing future blisters:

Whenever possible always keep feet clean and dry. Ensure boots are broken in for a good fit. Wear clean socks that also fit properly. Consider wearing thin liner socks (polypropylene or polyester) under heavier socks. Gloves can be worn on the hands to decrease friction as well.

As soon as you feel a hot spot developing, stop and apply a simple piece of tape placed directly over the hot spot. This will generally eliminate the friction that's causing the blister. You can also use Spenco 2nd skin, an inert breathable gel composed of 4% polyethelene oxide in water. It comes between two sheets of cellophane and feels like the consistency of snot. For a hot spot, one can remove one cellophane sheet, apply goopy side to flesh and secure it in place. Applied this way it is very effective at removing friction between surfaces.

Blunt Projectile Injury Edit

  • For legal purposes, document injuries with photos ASAP

First-aid:

  • If wound is open, wash with water and gentle soap.
  • Cover with clean, dry dressing (e.g., gauze pad).
  • Apply ice to reduce swelling (wrap in cloth or use ice pack; do not apply ice directly to skin).

Seek immediate medical care for:

  • Injuries to the head, neck, or spine.
  • Prolonged vomiting.
  • Blood in the urine if hit in the back.

Aftercare:

  • Be aware that pain and swelling may increase, and area of redness and bruising may expand, for up to 2-3 days.
  • Continue to apply ice as long as swollen.
  • Rest with injured arm or leg elevated.
  • Arnica is a good herbal remedy for bruising and swelling.
    • You can buy Homeopathic arnica pills at health food and large grocery stores. Dissolve them under the tongue as instructed on package. Potency: 30c.
    • Arnica oil may be applied to the skin for inflammation.

Seek further medical care for:

  • Injuries to the face (get checked for fractures).
  • Injuries that affect movement of a joint.
  • Signs of infection develop:
    • Red streaking of the surrounding skin.
    • Pus draining from area (It's not pus if it has been less than a day.)
    • Tender lumps or swelling in your armpit, groin, or neck.
    • Foul odor from the area.
    • Generalized chills or fever over 99.6 degrees F.

Burn Edit

Keep the burn area clean. You may apply nothing, or aloe to the burn. Cover with a sterile non-stick (Telfa) gauze. If you are dressing fingers or toes, wrap them so they are separated. Change dressing daily.

Before daily dressing change, soak area in warm salt water (1 teaspoon salt to 1 liter water) to loosen stuck bandages and soak off crusting areas. You can either rest the burned area in a tub, or soak a washcloth and apply it to the burned area. You may add 2 tablespoons of bleach to the water to protect against infection.

Do not break blisters. Fluid-filled blisters protect against infection. If blisters break, wash the area with mild soap and water, then apply an antibiotic ointment.

Prop burned area higher than the rest of the body, if possible.

A tetanus booster shot is recommended for anyone who has not had one in the last 8-10 years. See your healthcare worker.

Burns may heal with pigment changes, meaning the healed area may be a different color than the surrounding skin. Avoid re-injuring or tanning if the burns are less than a year old-- doing so may cause more extensive pigmentation changes.

Anesthetic creams or sprays are not recommended as they can provoke allergic reactions and may delay healing. Never put grease, lotions, honey or herbs other than aloe on a burn.

Follow-up with regular healthcare worker.

Seek medical attention if any signs of infection develop:

  • Increased redness, pain, swelling or warmth.
  • Red streaking of the surrounding skin.
  • Pus draining from area (It's not pus if it has been less than a day.)
  • Tender lumps or swelling in your armpit, groin, or neck.
  • Foul odor from the area.
  • Generalized chills or fever over 99.6 degrees F.
  • No healing in 6 days.

Additional information available from:

National Burn Victim Foundation, (201) 676-7700.

Chemical weapons exposure Edit

  • Don't panic and don't rub your eyes.
  • Remove contact lenses and dispose of them.
  • Flush eyes with a 50/50 solution of liquid antacid (Maalox) and water -- LAW -- or water alone.
  • Blow your nose, rinse mouth with water or LAW, spit it out.
  • Stand in fresh air, facing the wind.
  • Some people find wiping the skin with LAW brings relief.

Seek medical attention if:

  • You break out in a rash or experience persistent symptoms-- chemical weapons' effects are designed to be temporary. If you have persistent eye irritation, call an eye specialist.
  • Seek medical attention if symptoms re-appear, worsen or change.

Personal decontamination:

  • Shower in the coldest water you can stand, scrubbing vigorously with soap, being careful not to get chemicals from your hair onto your face.
  • Follow-up with regular healthcare worker.

Personal aftercare

  • Drink lots of water, eat nutritious food, get enough sleep.
  • Ask an herbalist about detoxifying herbs.

Clothing decontamination:

  • You should not enter an enclosed space wearing contaminated clothing.
  • Remove contaminated clothing and place it in sealed bag(s) until it can be disposed of or washed.
  • Tear gas-exposed clothing is best decontaminated by hanging on a clothesline on a windy day.
  • Clothing should only be washed in cold water in a well-ventilated area, ideally through several cycles with a harsh detergent soap.

Room, furniture or carpet decontamination:

  • Intensive air exchange, preferably with hot air.
  • Steam cleaning using a 5-10% baking soda in water solution.

To lessen the impact of future exposures:

  • Do not wear contact lenses.
  • Wash clothes beforehand with detergent-free soap.
  • Wash body beforehand with castille soap (like Dr. Bronners).
  • Do not put on oil-based moisturizers, make-ups or creams.
  • Try to ensure skin and clothes remain dry.
  • Minimize exposure; keep upwind.
  • Wear protective gear:
    • Water-repellant outer layer cinched at neck, ankles, wrist.
    • No exposed skin.
    • Eye protection with gas mask or sealed goggles.
    • Breathing protection with gas mask, chemical respirator or bandanna soaked in apple cider vinegar or lemon juice over mouth and nose.
  • If you experienced breathing difficulties you should avoid further exposure altogether.

Additional information available from:

http://blackcrosscollective.org/firstaidinfo

Dehydration Edit

A good indicator of proper fluid levels throughout the day is urine output and color. You, and all people in your group should strive to be "copious and clear." Ample urine that is light colored to clear shows that the body has plenty of fluid. Dark urine may mean that the body is low on water, and is trying to conserve its supply by hoarding fluid which makes the urine darker and more concentrated.

If you are suffering from dehydration

  • Replace water and electrolytes (a little bit of sugar, and a pinch of salt and potassium), by sipping nutritious fluids:
    • Pedialyte
    • Watered-down gatorade with a pinch of salt added
    • Water with "Emergen-C" powder and a pinch of salt
    • Water with bananas, rice and applesauce and a pinch of salt.
  • No further exertion for the day. Rest in bed until you recover.
  • Seek medical attention if symptoms reappear, worsen or change.
  • Follow-up with regular healthcare worker.
  • Drink lots of water (to the point of floating or at least 64 oz throughout the day) You may substitute nettle tea for some of the water.

To prevent future episodes of dehydration

  • Keep hydrated. Thirst cannot be relied on as an adequate measure of fluid status because it is a relatively late sign.
  • Prehydration provides a fluid "cushion" and delays the onset of dehydration. Drinking 16 oz of fluid the evening before, 16 oz in the morning and another 16 oz of fluid an hour before exertion should top off fluid stores.
  • Then drink 8 oz of fluid every 20 minutes during heavy activity, with a goal of not experiencing thirst.
  • Don't drink liquids that contain caffeine, alcohol, or large amounts of sugar (like soda) - these may actually cause you to lose more body fluid. Also avoid very cold drinks because these can cause stomach cramps.

The danger of dehydration is as possible in cold weather as it is in hot weather. In hot weather you are aware that your body is losing fluids and salt. You can see, taste and feel the sweat as it runs down your face.

In cold weather, however, it is extremely difficult to realize that you are losing water. In cold climates, sweat evaporates so rapidly or is absorbed so thoroughly by heavy clothing that it is rarely noticeable on the skin. Dehydration also occurs in cold weather because drinking is inconvenient.

Emotional stress Edit

Some people hold stress in their bodies following demos. This can show up as disturbed sleep, nightmares, anxiety, fear or depression. It can also trigger underlying stress from past events.

What you can do for yourself

  • Don't isolate yourself. Reach out to your friends and allies.
  • Remember-- what happened is not your fault. You don't need to feel ashamed or guilty, although you may find yourself having these normal responses to trauma. You coped the best you could with an utterly brutal situation.
  • Being here is a mark of your courage, commitment and integrity. Never let anyone tell you otherwise. Be proud.
  • Friends and family members, in their own distress, may behave in ways that make it worse. You have the absolute right to stop them, to leave a destructive situation, and to find real help.
  • Remember that people do survive even terrible things, and can come back stronger, but you may need time to focus on your own healing. Know that healing yourself is a political act.

What you can do to support your friends

  • Find them. Don't let them disappear into isolation.
  • Keep in contact. Call them; ask how they're doing, if they're sleeping. Remember that people may think they're fine at first, but later begin to suffer the effects of the trauma. Commit to remain in contact over a period of months, not just the first few days.
  • Help them to talk. We need to tell our stories, sometimes over and over and over again: ideally to someone who has been through it and understands, but if that's not possible, to someone who can simply listen, accept the full range of our feelings, without trying to make us feel better.
  • Feed them, shop, cook and clean for them, take care of some of their creature comforts.
  • Accompany them. Help them get where they need to go.
  • Be an advocate for them in taking medical, legal, or mental health measures. Find appropriate help and resources for them.
  • Be an advocate for them with their school or job.
  • Help support their friends who may also be in grief, shock, rage.
  • Be an advocate, or a buffer, between them and family members, lovers, or friends whose own level of stress and fear may cause them to react in ways that are not helpful. Be willing to let them get mad at you. Try to gently explain the reality of what happened.
  • Help them bear witness, but let them take the lead. Some people may find their greatest relief comes from speaking out and telling their story publicly. You can help interest the media, or set up venues for them to talk to groups. For others, however, this might be too overwhelming or restimulating. Help them find other ways to witness: writing their story, writing statements that can be read by others for them, making tapes or videos at home.
  • In all these things, remember that your friend is in charge of her or his own healing. Don't patronize or infantilize them, but support them to make their own choices.

Frostnip Edit

After the frost-nipped area is rewarmed, the layer of frozen skin will become red.

  • Prevent re-freezing and protect the thawed tissue from trauma. It will be extremely delicate and seemingly minor trauma can be damaging.

Over a period of several days, the appearance of the healing injury becomes similar to that of a sunburn as the dead skin starts to peel.

  • Aloe vera has been shown to be an effective topical ointment.

Seek medical attention if any signs of infection develop:

  • Increased redness, pain, swelling or warmth.
  • Red streaking of the surrounding skin.
  • Pus draining from area (It's not pus if it has been less than a day.)
  • Tender lumps or swelling in your armpit, groin, or neck.
  • Foul odor from the area.
  • Generalized chills or fever over 99.6 degrees F.

If any open areas develop, a tetanus booster shot is recommended for anyone who has not had one in the last 8-10 years. See your healthcare worker.

Since you have experienced a cold injury, you are at higher risk during future cold exposure.

Seek medical attention if your symptoms reappear, worsen or change.

Follow-up with regular healthcare worker.

To prevent future cold-related injuries:

  • Sufficient clothing must be worn for protection against cold and wind. Cover all skin. Layers of clothing that can be removed and replaced as needed are the most effective.
  • Clothing and equipment should be properly fitted to avoid any interference with blood circulation. Improper blood circulation reduces the amount of heat that reaches the extremities. Tight fitting socks, shoes and hand wear are hazardous under very cold conditions.
  • Every effort must be made to keep clothing and body as dry as possible. This includes avoiding any excessive perspiration by removing and replacing layers of clothing.
  • Foot powder or antiperspirant containing aluminum hydroxide can keep your feet from sweating for up to a month.
  • If your feet are wet, stop and dry your feet and put on dry socks.
  • Exercise fingers/toes to keep them warm and detect numbness.
  • Use chemical pocket, hand and foot warmers.
  • Move indoors once your fingers or toes begin to feel cold.
  • Never touch cold metal with bare skin.
  • Get adequate rest, fluid and food intake.
  • Avoid alcohol, fatigue, dehydration, and tobacco. Smoking during cold exposure further constricts peripheral blood vessels making cold injury more likely.

Hand cuff injury Edit

  • For legal purposes, document injuries with photos ASAP.
  • Draw the area of decreased sensation. Document that there is no weakness or area of total numbness.
  • Get further medical care.

About hand cuff injuries

These injuries are usually called "Handcuff neuropathies." They involve damage to the radial, ulnar, and/or median nerves caused by the compression of the handcuffs. The nerve damage can manifest as pain in the wrist, hand, and/or fingers; loss of strength and weakness of grip; numbness; loss of flexation; diminished light-touch sensation; and tingling sensation in fingers.

Another injury sometimes caused by being in handcuffs for a long time is SCM/ Scalene Syndrome. The muscles of the neck tighten and restrict the blood flow to the brachial plexus and hence to the arm/ wrist/ fingers. It is often misdiagnosed as Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and has the same symptom picture.

In the most common type of handcuff injury (experienced by 1 in every 20 people taken into police custody), feeling is numbed or altered in one or more fingers, but there is no muscle weakness or wasting. This is due to a burising of the superficial radial (thumb side) nerve, which will grow back in 1-12 months (usually about 2 months).

However, if you experience total numbness, weakness, or muscle wasting, permanent damage may occur. A special splint, deep tissue massage or Dieh Dah (Trauma) Acupuncture, physical therapy, or possible surgery may be required.

Self-care

In addition to any medical care you recieve, you may want to take the following self-care measures.

  • Homeopathic arnica is a good herbal remedy for bruising and swelling. You can buy these pills at health food and large grocery stores. Dissolve them under the tongue as instructed on package. Potency: 30c.
  • Homeopathic hypericum is a good remedy for nerve damage, potency 30c.
  • St. john's wort (hypericum) herbal tincture may be taken internally (but not the oil.) Consult an herbalist if possible, and do not use if you are taking anti-depressants.
  • A combination of hypericum, arnica, and hemp oil can be used externally on the skin. Evening primrose oil may be added to the mix.

Additional information available from:

  • Doc Rosen, OMD is a senior practitioner of Dieh Dah acupuncture, and can do phone consultations with an acupuncturist in your area. drrosen@dr.com, 303-333-9977.
  • Corey-Pine Shane, herbalist is available for phone consultations, and can send remedies to you by mail. coreypineus@yahoo.com, 828-275-6221.
  • Gail Dickinson, MD is available for telephone questions. Make it clear to her staff that this is an activist calling or you will be told she is not accepting new patients. 860-928-7775.

Head injury Edit

  • If you have just gotten a neck or spine injury, sit or lay still and ask someone to cradle your head in their hands so you won't move it. Tell them to be careful not to jostle you when they do. Call 911.
  • If you have a head injury, get further medical care.

Aftercare

  • For a minor head injury, consider leaving the action.
  • Try not to injure the head again; multiple concussions can be fatal.
  • If you do suffer a second head injury, seek immediate medical attention.
  • If you check out OK, you should head home and return to action only after a full week of no further symptoms and a follow-up with your healthcare worker.

If you sustained a more serious head injury:

After hospital assessment, you should have a responsible person stay with you to watch for the development of serious symptoms. The first 24 hours after injury are critical, although serious after-effects can appear up to 6 months after the injury.

  • You should rest in bed the first 24 hours.
  • The person watching you should wake you every 2 hours for the first 24 hours. See the checklist below for signs they should look for.
  • They should wake you every 4 hours the second day and every 8 hours the third.
  • Don't take any non-prescribed medicine, including aspirin, for at least the first 24 hours.
  • Follow-up with your regular healthcare worker.

Seek immediate further medical attention if you:

  • Can't be awakened or aroused.
  • Start vomiting.
  • Are unable to move your arms & legs equally well on both sides.
  • Have blood or fluid dripping from ears or nose.
  • Have a temperature above 100F (37.8C).
  • Cannot breathe well or breathe in a funny pattern.
  • Develop a stiff neck.
  • Are noticed to have pupils of unequal size or shape.
  • Are noticed having convulsions.
  • Develop noticable restlessness, confusion, or disorientation.
  • Have a persistent headache.

Additional information available from:

National Head Injury Foundation, 333 Turnpike Rd., Southborough, MA 01772. (800)444-6443

Heat injury Edit

Immediately get lots of fluids, such as Gatorade or just water. Seek medical attention.



Nosebleed Edit

  • Rest with your head elevated at 30 to 45 degrees. Try to keep your head higher than the level of your heart. You can do this by sleeping on several pillows.
  • Do not blow your nose, even if it feels blocked, for several days to avoid dislodging the blood clot. If you have to sneeze or cough, open your mouth so that the air will escape out the mouth and not through the nose.
  • Do not put anything up your nose.
  • Do not strain during bowel movements.
  • Do not strain or bend down to pick up anything heavy.
  • Do not smoke (dries out nasal passages making them more prone to rebleeding).
  • Stay on a soft cool diet. No hot liquids for 24 hours.
  • Do not take long hot showers or baths for 24 hours.
  • Do not take any nonprescription medicines which thin the blood such as aspirin, ibuprofin or naproxen (Alleve, Naprosyn).

If re-bleeding occurs:

  • Sit quietly. Do not lay flat or put your head between your legs.
  • Bend forward at the waist. Do not tip your head back (to prevent blood from running into the throat).
  • Clamp the soft parts of your nose closed with your fingers for 5 uninterrupted minutes without relieving pressure. Use a watch or a clock to make sure you keep up the pressure a full 5 minutes. During this time, breathe through your mouth. Holding your nose tightly closed allows the blood to clot and seal the damaged blood vessels.
  • If bleeding stops and recurs, repeat, but pinch your nose firmly on both sides for 10 minutes.
  • You may apply cold compresses to the cheeks and nose at the same time. Never apply ice directly to the skin.
  • Do not swallow blood. It may upset your stomach or make you gag, putting you at risk for choking.
  • Do not talk (also to avoid gagging).
  • Do not pack the nose with anything.

Seek medical attention if:

  • You have a nosebleed that won't stop with this method or keeps reoccurring.


Sprains / strains Edit

Rest, Ice, Compress, and Elevate the injured area. This is called RICE therapy.

Rest

  • Protect the injured joint from further injury by allowing the joint to rest 1 or 2 days with the aid of a sling or crutches. After a few days, you may use the joint as pain allows.
  • After a few days, begin exercising the joint gently, without putting any weight on it. Use ice when finished with the exercises to minimize inflammation.
  • Before resuming regular activities, be sure that you have full range of motion, strength and balance in the joint with no pain or swelling with activity. Do not ignore persistent joint pain; a body part that hurts should not be used.

Ice

Apply ice to the injured joint during the first day-- separated from the skin by a thin towel. Do not apply ice directly on the skin as this may cause frostbite. Keep the ice pack on the joint up to 2 hours at a time. Continue the ice treatment at 2 hour intervals.

On the second or third day, you may continue ice treatment or switch to heat. Heat, like ice, can deaden pain and promote healing, but it can also promote inflammation. When your greatest discomfort is associated with stiffness, heat may help.

To use heat, soak the joint in hot water, or apply heat for 15 minutes every 2 hours. But beware: if any swelling develops, stay away from heat.

Compression

  • An elastic (Ace) bandage should be used only if it makes the injured part feel better.
  • Use until completely healed-- usually 6 weeks-- and always remove during sleep. The bandage should be firm, but not too tight.
  • The limb should not swell, hurt, be cooler, or be discolored beyond the bandage.
  • When wrapping the bandage start at the most distant region and work toward the trunk of the body, making each loop a little closer than the one before. Don't stretch and wrap-- just roll it on.

Elevation

Whenever possible, elevate the joint (especially while sleeping), so fluid can drain and diminish swelling.

Other aftercare recommendations

  • Anti-inflammatory medicine may also be helpful. These include Aspirin, Ibuprofen, Homeopathic Arnica, and Arnica oil (Arnica oil should be used only on the skin). Talk with your healthcare provider before using a medicine you have not used before.
  • Seek further care if you are not improving each day after the first 48 hours
  • Follow-up with your regular healthcare provider.

Seek immediate further medical attention if:

  • Injured part gets cold or turns blue or numb.
  • Swelling or bruising increases, despite treatment.
  • Pain becomes intolerable.
  • You see redness or red streaks spreading out from the injury.
  • After 24 hours pain prevents any weight bearing on an injured ankle, or after 72 hours pain makes weight bearing difficult.

Be more cautious with knee injuries-- by 24 hours knee should look and feel relatively normal, though it may take weeks to heal.

To help prevent a recurrence we suggest:

  • Strengthen weak muscles with rehabilitative exercises.
  • Maintain good level of physical fitness and a healthy weight.
  • Wrap weak joints with support bandages before activity.
  • Do stretching exercises daily, especially before and after exercise.
  • Wear shoes that fit properly & don't have unevenly worn tread.
  • Avoid exercising when tired or in pain.
  • When running, stick to even surfaces.

Sunburn Edit

If available use a Hydrocortisone cream or Aloe. Do not apply any sort of oil, this applies for all burns. Standard over the counter medications will do for the pain.

Taser injury Edit

Upon contact, the Taser delivers a 5-second burst of 50,000 Volts of electricity. This weapon takes control of your body away from you while simultaneously delivering a lot of pain. The pain often hurts less than the humiliation and disrespect of being assaulted with this weapon.

  • Don't isolate yourself. Reach out to your friends and allies.
  • Being here is a mark of your courage, commitment and integrity. Never let anyone tell you otherwise. Be proud.
  • Friends and family members, in their own distress, may behave in ways that make it worse. You have the absolute right to stop them, to leave a destructive situation, and to find help.
  • Remember that people do survive terrible things, and can come back stronger, but you may need time to focus on your own healing. Know that healing yourself is a political act.
  • For legal purposes, document injuries with photos ASAP.

Seek immediate medical care for:

  • Injuries to the head, neck, or spine
  • Prolonged vomiting
  • Blood in the urine

Wound aftercare:

  • Be aware that pain and swelling may increase, and the area of redness and bruising may expand, for up to 2-3 days.
  • Apply ice as needed as long as swelling or localized muscle spasms persist.
  • Keep the burn area clean and wrapped in sterile non-adherent dressing. Change dressing daily.
  • Before daily dressing change, use lukewarm plain water compresses to help soak off crusting areas.
  • Arnica is good for bruising and swelling, and Hypericum is good for nerve damage. You can buy these Homeopathic pills at health food and large grocery stores. Dissolve them under your tongue as instructed on package.
  • A tetanus booster shot is recommended for anyone who has not had one in the last 8-10 years.
  • Follow-up with regular healthcare worker.

Supportive care

  • Replace electrolytes by sipping nutritious fluids like water with Gatorade or "Emergen-C" powder and with a pinch of salt added.
  • Get some rest and drink lots of water.

Seek further medical care for:

  • Injuries that affect movement of a joint.
  • Signs of infection:
    • Red streaking of the surrounding skin.
    • Pus draining from area (It's not pus if it has been less than a day.)
    • Tender lumps or swelling in your armpit, groin, or neck.
    • Foul odor from the area.
    • Generalized chills or fever over 99.6 degrees F.

Wound Edit

  • Stop bleeding by direct pressure or elevating injured area.
  • Clean the wound well with water.
  • Cover with a dry sterile gauze pad or clean cloth.
  • Do not remove an impaled object; stabilize it in place and seek medical care.
  • For nosebleeds, pinch nose until bleeding stops.
  • For eye injuries, cover eye and seek care.

Aftercare

  • Keep the wound clean. Wash the area gently with soap and water without scrubbing as the wound heals.
  • The wound area should otherwise be kept dry.
  • Change the dressing at least daily or whenever it becomes wet or dirty.
  • If you're allergic to the adhesive used in most bandages, switch to adhesive-free dressings or sterile gauze and paper tape. These supplies are generally available at pharmacies.
  • For painless tape or Band-aid removal, you may soak the adhesive tape in nail-polish remover (applied on the outside) for a few minutes. This will dissolve the adhesive and release both the skin and hair.
  • Try not to pick at the protective scab.

A tetanus booster shot is recommended if you have not had one in the last 10 years.

Seek medical attention if any signs of infection develop:

  • Increased redness, pain, swelling or warmth.
  • Red streaking of the surrounding skin.
  • Pus draining from area (It's not pus if it has been less than a day.)
  • Tender lumps or swelling in your armpit, groin, or neck.
  • Foul odor from the area.
  • Generalized chills or fever over 99.6 degrees F.
  • Not healing well within 1 to 2 weeks.

See a doctor if:

  • You were bitten by an animal (or a person).
  • You are cut on the chest, back, abdomen, face or hands, unless the cut is very small and shallow.
  • The cut cannot be fully cleaned of debris.
  • You have any deep puncture wounds.
  • You have any numbness, weakness, or cannot move beyond the wound.
  • You have any wound requiring stitches-- if it otherwise cannot be closed, the cut is deep (you might see a white fatty layer), has jagged or bruised edges or flaps of skin, or if it is in an area (like on a joint) where the edges may be pulled apart. Stitches are accepted best if placed within 8 hours of injury. Any cut that might need stitches should be seen as soon as possible. Additionally, any cut that may need stiches should be thoroughly rinsed with sterile water and protected with layers of steril gauze. If you know how to use them, you can also apply butterfly bandages to help keep foriegn objects out of the wound. These are not substitutes for stitches. You will still need to get to a hospital immediately.

If you are immunocompromised, have a chronic illness such as diabetes, or have prosthetic heart valves or orthopedic prostheses, ask your doctor about antibiotics to prevent infection.

Always follow up with your health care provider.

This informational sheet is no substitute for the treatment and advice of a qualified health care professional.

NotesEdit

This material is intended as a training supplement. Reading this material is no substitute for first aid / medical training with a qualified trainer. We encourage you to pursue ongoing education, reviewing and upgrading your skills-- for the safety of both yourself and anyone you treat.

See "Healing resources" links from http://www.freewebs.com/stormnyc/resources.htm

Also see BARHC Aftercare Tips

Original source Edit

See List of original sources#Injury aftercare.

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